Late Shift Extra: ReAnimate Drop In Experience
As I entered the gallery it was buzzing with splashes of white and red wine, vibrant music echoed against the gallery wall as I drifted up the cloudy steps of the escalator to attend the Drop In Drawing Experience at the National Portrait Gallery.
In Room 12 all drop ins sat down and we were given a quick brief regarding touch and how to translate the concept into planes; meaning that by making yourself see a portrait in geometrical forms you are able to make it three dimensional, to make it come alive.
At first I thought, “that’s a really obvious point, duh”! As the evening passed I was proven wrong as I realised through two sketches that this point was harder to execute than I initially thought.
In my first sketch I focussed on boldly sketching out the planes, by doing this I identified the geometrical features in the face, and this made it easier to bring out shadows and uncover more than one plane in a shape. 
In the second sketch, I lightly drew a web of planes and worked from them to identify the spaces where tone and shade should be applied. To date this is my best success rate for drawing a nose.
Throughout the session the artist leading the class, Andy Pankhurst came around and provided guidance and constructive criticism on each individuals work. I appreciate that he was comfortable to do this as I felt I could be genuinely open about what confused me, (the nose) and he guided my thoughts as I drew it for a few minutes.
Overall I am really impressed with the experience of the National Portrait Gallery’s drop in sessions. Once the slight discomfort of not knowing anyone passed away and I was stuck in the drawing, I came away feeling I had gained a new segment of drawing knowledge.
My envy of children drawing during gallery activity days has also faded, as I can know experience the gallery like a child too. I can sit and draw like I used to when I begged Mum to take me to those events. I can sit and draw and imerse myself in a painting or sculpture rather than just walking around and ooohing and aaagghin until my feet ache and I want to sit down. 
Thank You for the drop ins for Big People.

Late Shift Extra: ReAnimate Drop In Experience

As I entered the gallery it was buzzing with splashes of white and red wine, vibrant music echoed against the gallery wall as I drifted up the cloudy steps of the escalator to attend the Drop In Drawing Experience at the National Portrait Gallery.

In Room 12 all drop ins sat down and we were given a quick brief regarding touch and how to translate the concept into planes; meaning that by making yourself see a portrait in geometrical forms you are able to make it three dimensional, to make it come alive.

At first I thought, “that’s a really obvious point, duh”! As the evening passed I was proven wrong as I realised through two sketches that this point was harder to execute than I initially thought.

In my first sketch I focussed on boldly sketching out the planes, by doing this I identified the geometrical features in the face, and this made it easier to bring out shadows and uncover more than one plane in a shape. 

In the second sketch, I lightly drew a web of planes and worked from them to identify the spaces where tone and shade should be applied. To date this is my best success rate for drawing a nose.

Throughout the session the artist leading the class, Andy Pankhurst came around and provided guidance and constructive criticism on each individuals work. I appreciate that he was comfortable to do this as I felt I could be genuinely open about what confused me, (the nose) and he guided my thoughts as I drew it for a few minutes.

Overall I am really impressed with the experience of the National Portrait Gallery’s drop in sessions. Once the slight discomfort of not knowing anyone passed away and I was stuck in the drawing, I came away feeling I had gained a new segment of drawing knowledge.

My envy of children drawing during gallery activity days has also faded, as I can know experience the gallery like a child too. I can sit and draw like I used to when I begged Mum to take me to those events. I can sit and draw and imerse myself in a painting or sculpture rather than just walking around and ooohing and aaagghin until my feet ache and I want to sit down. 

Thank You for the drop ins for Big People.